Posts Tagged ‘design’
Jan 30, 2012
Future of software UI and widget graphic design

Hyperlinks, textboxes, and buttons are forever. But are there more intuitive widgets to be created? This is the stuff I think about as a graphic designer when I’m bored, people. With all this new touchscreen, finger motion tech, what’s coming? (more…)

Sep 4, 2011
Agent S: The Football Suit

Every superhero needs that power suit. (more…)

Aug 10, 2011
Saelee Deus Ex Machine (SDXM): A 2D Game Engine Features List

I’m getting a steady 33 frames per second and have tested on Windows XP, Vista, and 7! If you have Vista or Windows 7, you’ll be good to go. If you have Windows XP or previous versions of Windows, you might have to get the .Net Framework to run my application. Anyway, here’s a list of features I’m planning on implementing. (more…)

Aug 7, 2011
Code Problem Solved: How to Implement z-order Rendering

If you’ve dealt with cascading style sheets (CSS) in web design, then you might be aware of z-index (also known as z-order). This special attribute tells the web browser to render elements in a certain order. But specifically in webpages, a z-index can range from 0 to 99, where 0 is the farthest back element (it is rendered first) and 99 is the front most element (it is rendered last). All is well when the software’s already working for you, but what about in game development? Here’s a way… (more…)

Jun 25, 2011
Custom Font Javascript + CSS Implementation

Copyright © 2011 By Chongchen Saelee

There’s only a handful of “websafe” fonts, a collection of fonts that any Internet user’s computer will most likely already have preloaded whether with their operating system or Internet browser. So when a webpage designer is feeling limited with his font selection, he either has to rasterize that custom font into an image or force the user to download the custom font. If the user has to download a custom font, it’s never a gaurantee that it will be compatible as there are many formats of fonts. Even with rasterized fonts as images, depending on how much text needs to be shown, the graphic might get really big and weigh down the downloading speed or drawing performance.

The most efficient method is probably to create a real font using a font editor and hope it works on the user’s end. But font editors cost money, and if you’re not a hardcore typographer, what’s the point of investing in it? So I’m going to attempt to create a “free” solution: implement a simple javascript font system based on a sprite sheet. This is a technique commonly used in game development and I’m sure others out there have done similar thing.

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Jun 17, 2011
Webpage design guidelines for 2011 ad infinitum

While tinkering with my Blogger blog’s template, and consulting with the experts online regarding the latest webpage design standards, I began to wonder myself how adaptable my designs were. At times, I’m looking at my handiwork stretched to fill these 16:9 or 16:10 monitors and am satisfied it takes advantage of all that space. However, then I remember back to my 4:3 CRT monitors and how I was able to design to best utilize its space. So whatever was designed for 4:3 in mind now looks constrained for 16:9 because of the extra space on the sides. So what is the right way to design? (more…)

Aug 23, 2010
Akira live adaptation film and localization

Feb. 14, 2010In latest movie rumors making its round in the Internet, James Franco is apparently in talks to play Kaneda. Wuzzah? (more…)

Dec 30, 2009
Customizing The WordPress Layout

Here’s a picture of a pretty lady to distract youse:

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Photo caption goes here.

So upon further inspection of the WordPress default template layout, I found it to be incredibly object-oriented in design, which is a good thing. The people behind this content management system (CMS) blog are programmers but at the same time have proven their software can produce very beautiful presentation without looking too mechanical. But that’s not to say mechanical, or minimalistic, is necessarily undesirable (I don’t want to deal with the complexities of the guts).

Basically, the default components of a WordPress blog are:

  • header
  • content
  • sidebar
  • footer

And there’s a high probability that most web pages are designed like this, especially when there is navigation. A WordPress blog then becomes like a library card catalog (yikes, youngin’s won’t remember those) and visitors can easily access entries from past dates. Before CMS existed, most HTML designers were linking pages manually. I’ve found myself doing that to this day and it’s still a pain, especially when I want to post all sorts of junk simultaneously without having to worry about organization.

So far, I’ve been trying to really minimize the layout.