Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Sep 29, 2014

Flash Photography For Selfies

Svengali

Svengali

As I learn, flash photography makes you look more masculine because the light is so hot. It creates very deep and sharp shadows. I had to pull them out with Photoshop, but that’s how it’s done. It emphasizes a man’s jawline. LOL. However, it’s hard to keep your eyes open with the flash and look natural. Oh well, Halloween’s coming up. Here’s my Svengali look. LOL.

Aug 13, 2014

Book of Lea Now Available On Sale 40% Off!!!

Book Of Lea On Sale 40% Off!!!

Book Of Lea On Sale 40% Off!!!

Book of Lea is now available! On Sale! 40% Off! Only $14.97!!!

Order your copy today! Order your copy via Lulu.com bookstore at:

http://www.lulu.com/shop/chongchen-saelee/book-of-lea/paperback/product-21745507.html

Thanks for your patronage!!!

Aug 4, 2014

I’m Officially a Published Photographer!!!

Book of Lea published!!!

I’m accomplishing my goals and dreams in earnest. This is almost 15 years in the making. The proof just came in and the colors and cropping aren’t right, but that’s something I can fix before I ship it off again.

Any interested buyers, get in contact with me. Just know you won’t get it right away.

Jul 16, 2014

Simple Retouch Tips To Make Female Face More Feminine

Model Lea Photo By Eastfist

Model Lea Photo By Eastfist

By Chongchen Saelee

Here are the very simple retouch steps I took to make Lea really pop out and look feminine.

  • Soft lighting
  • Enhanced color in pupils
  • Put some color into cheeks and nose to give youthful look
  • Enhanced contrast of shadows and highlights to create moist skin effect
  • Smaller nose
  • Color correction that is more pinkish associated with fertility

Other things you could have also done:

  • Moisten the lips, but don’t overdo it
  • Moisten the hair, make it extra shiny
  • Cliche, but photoshop in jewelry, subtle earring, necklace, etc.
  • Vignette with feminine symbology, background, etc

Dec 6, 2013

Frozen River Adventure with Eastfist

Empty park bench overlooking frozen river

Empty park bench overlooking frozen river

More photos and a short film ahead…

(more…)

Apr 29, 2013

Needed Equipment for Photo Project (Sponsored Post)

NOTE: THIS IS A SPONSORED POST

Photo3

By Vanessa Bennet
vanessab@lashopmail.com

Sometimes I feel like just getting away, like going on an unending vacation. It’s a way of escaping from life’s trivialities, of getting more out of our limited time, and not being locked down in some dead end job that I hate and don’t want to spend any more seconds at.

I hate getting bogged down with these thoughts, mostly because I know I really can’t do that and I have to come up with a different solution to escape life’s doldrums. Well, one thought I had was just to take pictures of myself in front of (more…)

May 31, 2012

New scans of old photos

Ah, first-hand experience of learning to photograph and how much pixel power film has. (more…)

Jun 27, 2009

Digital Cameras and The Art of Photography

Reflecting on the act of photographing a subject, I find that digital cameras are more efficient. A user can point-and-shoot, and if the camera has an lcd preview screen, the user can get what we call “instant gratification,” see the shot as it was taken.
I’ve shot with a 35mm SLR and I love the precision in it’s focusing and exposure, but I’ve always detested the film development process. It’s one thing if the picture was exposed properly during shoot, but it’s another when the developer can ruin a perfectly exposed film. With a digital, the user doesn’t have to worry as long as he isn’t a complete luddite (anti-techie) or just plain incompetent with technology.
Of course, there is a big difference between how film photography and digital photography look. Just through history, photo enthusiasts have been conditioned to love the grain of film photos. But with the advent of ultra high resolution digital photos, emerging photographers are demonstrating that detail, “more power” and technology can still produce beautiful images without taking away from the artistic aspects of photography.
Therefore, not just anyone can pick up a digital camera and expect quality results. I’m not claiming to be a master photographer, but I do have some training in traditional photography. I believe that the training helps me in composition, lighting, exposure, and technique. I don’t just point and shoot, even though that’s the main selling point of most digitals.
And now the technology has caught up with itself. There’s the Nikon D3X, a 24 megapixel digital SLR. I would love to get one, but it’s a whopping $7,000! A DSLR with this much resolution can simulate a very high quality grain 35mm negative. Therefore, any interested users has to think about the payoff: invest seven grand now and start reproducing high quality 35mm photos, or continue to use the old 35mm SLR and continue to pay for rolls of film and possible third party developing? The costs add up. My personal goal would be the DSLR, if you can afford it now, it will pay for itself.
Sure, as I’ve said before, the looks of each media differ dramatically, but because of the existing digital tools, even digital images can simulate the film look via a plugin. But then again, why not embrace the high quality aspect of digital photography? Although the creation of photography was by accident (most technology is), the art always comes into play when the artist tries to recreate reality. Digital photos are looking more like reality, or more accurately, hyper reality (the human eye cannot see the hair follicle texture coming out of your nose).
My personal opinion is to embrace digital, but not to forget it’s ancestors and the practice. Anyone can take a picture, but not anyone can take a great picture.